Stripping it back – building resilience in school leaders

Wednesday, 13 March 2019

Controlled school leaders from across Northern Ireland have come together as part of an event focusing on building resilience.

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Sara Long speaking

The event, co-hosted by the Controlled Schools’ Support Council (CSSC) and the Education Authority (EA), took place on Friday 8 March 2019.

A panel discussion featuring serving principals delved into what challenges school leaders face and how they maintain and build their resilience. 

This was followed by a session with facilitator Billy Dixon, who gave a practical and interactive presentation based on research and personal experience.   This enabled each participant to leave with a tool kit that will help them, their staff and perhaps even their pupils improve their resilience.

Speaking at the event, Chief Executive Designate of the Education Authority (EA), Sara Long said;

“The Education Authority (EA) welcomes the opportunity to collaborate with the Controlled Schools’ Support Council during this important event.

“EA recognises the vital role played by our principals and senior school leaders, who are key to delivering strong leadership in these increasingly challenging times. It is important that we work together to build resilience and equip our leaders with the skills required to continue to inspire, support and challenge our children and young people to be the best that they can be.”

Barry Mulholland, Chief Executive of CSSC also highlighted the importance of the event, saying

“CSSC delivers events based on feedback and need evidenced by controlled school principals.  We continuously hear that principals are under severe strain to deliver quality education in a shrinking financial environment.

“This event, therefore, is important to enable the conversation to begin about how we can work together to support controlled school leaders.  In order to leaders need to instil a resilient culture within their school, they also need to look after themselves; this is something that is often overlooked.”

Last modified: 14/03/2019